• A FREE SOCIALLY-DISTANCED PERFORMANCE IN CHICAGO'S PARKS

    Now - Oct. 3

  • SUPPORT THIS FREE PRODUCTION OF FANNIE LOU HAMER, SPEAK ON IT!

     

CHICAGO’S THEATER SINCE 1925

A Not-For-Profit Arts and Civic Organization in the Heart of the Loop

An Invitation from E. Faye Butler

Join Us For Fannie Lou Hamer, Speak On It!

E. Faye Butler gives us a special preview of Fannie Lou Hamer, Speak On It! This free, socially-distanced production is touring select Chicago parks Sept. 17 - Oct. 3. We'll see you in the parks!

Arts As Education

Did you know that the Goodman impacts thousands of Chicago youth and lifelong learners each year through a host of Education and Engagement programs?

Our Alice Rapoport Center is home to it all. Join us! Explore all Education & Engagement programming >>

Season News

JOIN US FOR OUR NEXT ACT—THE 2021 SEASON

As Chicago’s theater since 1925, we have faced adversity, demonstrated resilience and are proud to be a mainstay for our community. We can’t wait to welcome you back, and raise our curtain on our next act—eight plays that reconnect us and illuminate our humanity, with the quality you trust and artistic excellence you expect from the Goodman.

LEARN MORE

In The News

Sign up for our newsletter or follow @goodmantheatre on Instagram to get your inside look.

  • E. Faye Butler as Fannie Lou Hamer

    Review: Fannie Lou Hamer, played in a Chicago park by E. Faye Butler, roars out a timely message

    By Chris Jones, Chicago Tribune

    "[E. Faye] Butler’s fiery monologue, oft-underscored on live electric blues guitar by the musician Felton Offard, had such power and potency, it echoed and reverberated with sharp cracks, its constituent words bouncing off the shuttered playground, the field house, the empty baseball diamond."

    READ MORE

  • Fannie Lou Hamer

    Speak on It! Fannie Lou Hamer's Legacy Takes the Chicago Stage With a 9-Venue Outdoor Run—and a Voting Drive

    By Maiysha Kai, The Root

    "Inspired by [Fannie Lou] Hamer’s fiery rhetoric and 'all the audacious Mississippi women' in her own family, [Cheryl L.] West also shared that she was 'especially motivated to tell the story of a Mississippian woman in her own vernacular and to share the folksy poetry and fire in her spoken word'—including the famed spirituals 'I Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me ‘Round,' 'We Shall Not Be Moved' and 'I’m on My Way to Freedom.'”

    READ MORE

  • Speak On It Mobile Trailer

    Goodman Theatre brings live theater to the parks, with timely tale of Fannie Lou Hamer

    By Catey Sullivan, Chicago Sun-Times

    Playwright Cheryl L. West says "I feel like right now, we’ve lost some hope. And when you lose hope, you start to feel helpless... Fannie [Lou Hamer] never allowed herself to feel helpless... We don’t have time to wring out hands. Now is the time for artists to get busy. Whatever your gift is, now is the time to give it to the world because people need it. They need hope and inspiration...”

    READ MORE

  • Dael Orlandersmith

    Dael Orlandersmith Receives Doris Duke Artist Award

    "The Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (DDCF) has announced the winners of the 2020 Doris Duke Artist Awards, which awards each artist with a total of $275,000 in unrestricted funds including $25,000 dedicated to encouraging retirement savings." The winners of this year's prize include, among others, Goodman Theatre Artistic Associate Dael Orlandersmith.

    READ MORE

  • Goodman's 2021 Season

    Goodman Theatre announces 2021 Season

    Five of the productions on the docket have been previously announced...But there are also three newly announced shows: a production of a new play called the ripple, the wave that carried me home by Christina Anderson (in collaboration with the Berkeley Repertory Theatre), a reprise of Mary Zimmerman’s The Notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci, and a staging of Fannie, a one-person play with gospel music about activist Fannie Lou Hamer that stars E. Faye Butler.

    READ MORE

CELEBRATING 95 YEARS

Today's Goodman Theatre traces its roots back to the dream of multifaceted artist, Kenneth Sawyer Goodman, who worked to open Chicago's first major theater and training program from drama students at the Chicago Art Institute.

Goodman's parents took up his cause after his death and in the fall of 1925, the Kenneth Sawyer Goodman Memorial Theatre opened its doors. Our Full History >

Visitor Info

Getting to the Goodman is easy.

Our central location is in close proximity to I-55, I-90/94, I-290 and Lake Shore Drive, as well as all major CTA rail lines and many bus routes. Multiple parking lots are located near the theater, and Goodman patrons have options for discounted parking rates. More help getting here.


A few links to answer all your questions.

Frequently Asked Questions: We get these all the time; yours is probably here.

Food & Drinks Nearby: Where to go before and after the show.

Where to Stay: Traveling? Here are our recommended accommodations.

Theater Services: Coat check, lost and found, emergency info.

Accessibility: We strive to make performances and facilities accessible to all patrons.