<em>Home/Land</em>

July 18 - 28, 2013 In the Owen
Approximate running time: 1 hour 45 minutes with no intermission

  • Passionately performed”— Chicago Tribune
  • A passionate and well-argued piece of political theater”— Chicago Tribune
  • Albany Park Theater Project, one of Chicago's more remarkable artistic institutions”— Chicago Tribune
  • Deeply committed”— Chicago Tribune

A brother sings his sister to sleep with the tale of a glorious tree whose roots grow on both sides of a border. A pair of young lovers dance on their wedding night, then wade across the Río Grande hand-in-hand as their honeymoon.

A precocious seven year old in Jordan becomes an unconventional entrepreneur to pay for her family’s immigration. A nine year old joins the guerrilla in El Salvador after the murder of his parents. A boat hurls two dozen immigrants across the Gulf of Mexico. A father and son rehearse new identities for a new life. So begin the epic quests of Home/Land. With its characteristic humanity, creativity, and optimism, the award-winning Albany Park Theater Project ensemble brings to vivid theatrical life these stories of desire, risk, resilience, heroism, love and hope—as immigrant families strive to stay together and make a better life in the land they’ve come to call home.

Presented in English with Spanish Supertitles

Photos
  • Home/Land Production Photos
    Ely Espino, Electra Tremulis and the Albany Park Theater Project ensemble in Albany Park Theater Project's production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

  • Home/Land Production Photos
    (L to R): J.P. Marquez and Stephany Perez in Albany Park Theater Project's production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

  • Home/Land Production Photos
    (L to R): Stephany Perez and J.P. Marquez in Albany Park Theater Project's production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

  • Home/Land Production Photos
    (L to R): Raul Rico, Stephanie Castrejon, Paloma Morales, Randy Kim Dang and Lilia T. Escobar in Albany Park Theater Project's production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

  • Home/Land Production Photos
    (L to R): Raul Rico and J.P. Marquez in Albany Park Theater Project's production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

  • Home/Land Production Photos
    (L to R): Stephany Perez and J.P. Marquez in Albany Park Theater Project's production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

  • Home/Land Production Photos
    (L to R): Lilia T. Escobar, Randy Kim Dang, Raul Rico, Stephanie Castrejon and Paloma Morales in Albany Park Theater Project's production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

  • Home/Land Production Photos
    (L to R): Raul Rico, Stephanie Castrejon, Paloma Morales, Randy Kim Dang and Lilia T. Escobar in Albany Park Theater Project's production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

  • Home/Land Production Photos
    (L to R): Nichole A. Martinez, Osbaldo Antuñez and Jalen D. Rios in Albany Park Theater Project's production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

  • Home/Land Production Photos
    Luis Manuel Millan in Albany Park Theater Project's production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

  • Home/Land Production Photos
    Jalen D. Rios in Albany Park Theater Project's production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

  • Home/Land Production Photos
    The Albany Park Theater Project ensemble in their production of Home/Land at Goodman Theatre.

See All Photos
OnStage+

Why Home/Land?

By Robert Falls, Artistic Director of Goodman Theatre

In a city of distinctive neighborhoods, the northwest side community of Albany Park is one of Chicago’s most ethnically diverse. Although the neighborhood was founded in the late nineteenth century by German and Swedish immigrants, its current residents (numbering over 57,000) can trace their roots to dozens of countries, from Asia (Cambodia, Vietnam, Uzbekistan) to Eastern Europe (Poland, the Ukraine); from Central and South America (Mexico, Colombia, El Salvador) to Africa and the Mideast (Jordan, Nigeria, and Palestine). More than 50 percent of today’s Albany Park community were born outside the United States, and despite the creeping effects of gentrification, the neighborhood remains largely working-class.

Of the many societal issues explored by Albany Park Theater Project (APTP)—poverty, child abuse and neglect, gang violence, the inequalities of the public education system—since its founding in 1997, none has more personal and community impact than that of immigration. In Home/Land, first presented in APTP’s home space in 2012, the Project’s young creators and artists have transcended the myriad political complexities of America’s immigration policies to focus on the personal and often harrowing effects of these policies. Based on interviews with family members and community residents as well as their own experiences, Home/Land is imbued with indelible images and true stories: a boat carrying two dozen immigrants traverses the perilous waters of the Gulf of Mexico; a nine-year-old joins the guerilla forces of El Salvador after the savage murder of his parents; a father and son carefully rehearse the identities that they have created for a new life. Staged by APTP’s Founder and Artistic Director David Feiner and a team of directors, choreographers and designers that includes some of Chicago’s finest theater artists, Home/Land is a journey into the stark truths behind the seemingly endless political debates, a journey which astonishingly retains the hope and optimism of its young storytellers. Through its clear-eyed, unsentimental view of the present, it imagines a world of the future, with an emotional power that elicited critical and audience plaudits in its first incarnation.

This production is a fitting conclusion to a Latino Theatre Festival whose scope has been unusually far-ranging: from Pedro Paramo’s journey through a surreal landscape to unlock the torments of the past, to the search for healing and acceptance after the devastations of war and lost love in The Happiest Song Plays Last, to, in Home/Land, the revelation of the personal truths that lie beneath political rhetoric. I am enormously proud of the work that has comprised this Festival, and of Festival Curator and Goodman Artistic Associate Henry Godinez, and I hope that you have found it equally compelling. We are very proud indeed to end the Festival with a continuation of one of our most valued partnerships, with a theater that is widely recognized as one of the finest companies of its kind in the country: the Albany Park Theater Project.

Talks & Events

Sponsors Become a Sponsor

Sponsors