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I want your life, no wait I want my life back!

Posted by: Kadiatou Bah at 01/26/2015 02:00 PM
I want your life, no wait I want my life back!

Imagine a world where women can have it all, where they can take care of their  kids and also have a career in whatever they desire. “Rapture, Blister, Burn,” now on the main stage at the Goodman Theatre, suggests there is no such thing.                


A Modern-Day Feminist?

Posted by: Madelynn Bolster at 01/26/2015 02:00 PM
A Modern-Day Feminist?

In “Rapture, Blister, Burn” by Gina Gionfriddo, directed by Kimberly Senior, feminism is taken to a whole new level.


Feminism Raptures, Blisters, and Burns Out

Posted by: Katie Burke at 01/26/2015 02:00 PM
Feminism Raptures, Blisters, and Burns Out

Throughout the month of February the Goodman Theatre has been producing a show that the Huffington Post calls, “piercingly sharp,” and The New York Times calls “intensely smart, and immensely funny.”

It’s clear “Rapture, Blister, Burn” has wowed heavyweights in the theatre community. But it did not wow this critic.


“Rapture, Blister, Burn” by Gina Gionfriddo

Posted by: Simone Miklosi at 01/26/2015 02:00 PM
“Rapture, Blister, Burn” by Gina Gionfriddo

Feminism is a word most people don’t understand.  Despite its simple meaning -- the advocacy of women's rights on the grounds of political, social, and economic equality to men -- people turn it into a gigantic beast that must not be disturbed or deciphered. Honestly, it infuriates me, which is why “Rapture, Blister, Burn” has become my favorite piece of art ever performed at the Goodman Theatre.


Rapture, Blister, Burn

Posted by: Rena Newman at 01/26/2015 02:30 PM
Rapture, Blister, Burn

Rapture, Blister, Burn is a show as intriguing as its title. Steeped in wit, quip, and honesty the show is a lesson in feminist history and an exploration of what it means to be a woman today.Rapture raises crucial questions. While the topic of many classic plays seems to be about manhood, this one is about womanhood. It speaks to those intricate, complicated parts that come with the gender. The audience is made to think long and hard about ‘the way things are’ for women, and then think harder; wondering ‘is there another way’? And while the show is about women, it’s no tune-out or turn-off for men either.